Shifting Students' ROLE

Shifting Students' ROLE

One of the many things that attracted me to the teaching profession, and something on which I thrive throughout the year, it that it is mentally and physically challenging. According to research, teachers make between 1000 and 1500 educational decisions a day. During breaks from school, most teachers take advantage of the opportunity to get away from making decisions--from thinking so much. I occasionally do the same, but I’m usually in a constant pattern of reflecting and looking ahead for ways I can improve. There are always new ideas out there that I’m eager to try, which is why I’m never ready for school to start. It’s less than two weeks from the first day of school, and I’m almost ready. That status probably won’t change much because I’m never truly, completely, 100 percent ready to start school. I’m never finished planning my next move. 

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Teaching Others How to Think

Teaching Others How to Think

The summit was opened with a short round table discussion with Jamie Woodson, the CEO of SCORE, moderating an education discussion with Governor Haslam and Candice McQueen, the state’s Commission of Education. Naturally, the news cameras were rolling, and Governor Haslam made headlines when he said “What scares me the most about our country right now is we don’t have people who are really doing the hard work to think–and I think you learn how to think in school...One of the benefits of education is understanding that there are different points of view. Whether you're teaching calculus or 2nd grade, it doesn't matter; you're teaching people how to think.” His comments got me thinking about my own classroom as well as the educational landscape as a whole. One of the main reasons why I chose to teach English, instead of another subject is because it organically lends itself to students developing and defending their own interpretations of the text. Am I doing a doing a good job of allowing them to do this? Are teachers in general doing a good job of encouraging students to think and to look at things from different points of view?

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Reflecting Through The 12 Touchstones

Reflecting Through The 12 Touchstones

I recently had the opportunity to interact with McREL CEO Bryan Goodwin.  McREL, for those who do not know, stands for Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning.  If you teach in my school district, you are very familiar with McREL’s work.  When I started as an educator, my induction trainings focused heavily on the research of Robert Marzano, and particularly, the book Classroom Instruction That Works (CITW).  CITW served as an essential foundation in the development of my pedagogy, and I self-assess often to make sure I am not losing sight of my core competencies in the classroom.

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Substandard Standards Training

Substandard Standards Training

For those of you who think that teachers have two months off in the summer to relax and forget about school and then magically flip the switch when school begins, then think again. An extraordinary amount of thinking and planning goes into every lesson--especially for the first five days of school. These opening days are crucial. It’s where the foundation is laid for the remainder of the school year. Students find out answers to important questions like:

“How much homework will I get?”

“Will this class be easy or hard?”

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7 Ways Micro-Credentials Personalize Professional Learning For TN Teachers

7 Ways Micro-Credentials Personalize Professional Learning For TN Teachers

I love the micro-credential pilot program I have participated in with a novice-teacher from my school.  In lieu of a blog post this week, I created this infographic detailing how micro-credentials are creating an environment of personalized professional growth for educators. 

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